CHEMISTRY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

09/05/18

Chemistry Course Description and Policies

Piedmont Hills High School

Mr. Trask

traskm@esuhsd.org

 

A  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course Description:  The chemistry course at Piedmont Hills High School is a college prep course that covers all required and several optional subjects listed in the Next Generation Science Standards. This course is designed for students to gain the knowledge and skills required for careers in health, science, or technology. Example careers include nursing and medicine, physical therapy and sports therapy, food industries, science, engineering, and agriculture. For students who do not enter these professions an understanding of chemistry helps us make intelligent choices in our daily lives about our own health, the foods we eat, and the environment in which we live. This course fulfills a laboratory science requirement for admission to the University of California and the California State University system.

 

Subjects covered include:

 

Activities include teacher presentations and demonstrations, student discussions and laboratory activities.  Students will often assist the teacher in demonstrations of concepts (participants receive participation points).  Labs are conducted both in and out of class and in groups. The course will also have its share of assigned homework and exams.

 

B  PRE-REQUISITES

None

 

C  OBJECTIVE LEARNING GOALS

Expectations for Students:  

Students are expected to perform normal student activities such as: attendclass, be preparedbefore the bell rings, participatein group activities and laboratory experiments, presentcompetent laboratory reports, readall assigned materials, completein-class writing activities and homework, as well as to studyand learnthe material. Students are also expected to respecteach other and the teacher.

1.STANDARDS           The major objective is for all students to become proficient in the Next Generation Science Standards NGSS.  Assessments of success will be in the form of practice work (homework), laboratory investigations (reports), quizzes (free response format), and examinations (multiple choice format).

2.ACADEMIC SKILLS – TOOLS FOR SUCCESS        

            i          Students will enhance and utilize their problem solving and math skills through home work, in laboratory work, and on exams.  

            ii          As good written communication is essential in all walks of life, including Chemistry, students will practice their literacy skills.  Many homework problems are descriptive, rather than mathematical in nature.  Laboratory reports require competent writing skills, as well as essay questions on exams. Scoring of reports and exams is based in part upon the quality of the written communication (grammar, spelling, etc.)

            iii         Information is often times available to students only via a teacher led presentation or discussion (some college courses actually are entirely lecture based – no books!)  It is vital that the student retain this information for later reference. Consequently, note taking and summative skills will be stressed.  Students are expected to take notes anytime information is presented in class.  

 

3.ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY TO SUCCESS         This can be thought of in various ways – good work habits, discipline, a structured routine.  A student needs to maintain a commitment in order to achieve academic success.

            i           Due dates should be met for all work.  Homework will be posted on Schoolloop.  Homework will not be collected daily, but students are required to adhere to this schedule.  Periodic participation checks will verify this is the case.  ALL assigned homework will be collected on a specified date at the conclusion of the unit, (see due dates below).  

                        Lab reports will be given due dates as well.  

 

D  CLASS POLICIES and FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO GRADE

 

1.MATERIALS (supports academic success and academic responsibility)

The following 8 items are Requiredat all times unless noted: 

            textbook

            2pencils

            3 ruled or graph paper (for notes and work)

            4 binder containing all returned work, notes, handouts, and current homework

            5 scientific calculator

            6 ruler

            7 a means of saving computer generated work electronically (flash drive, email account, etc)

            8 Downloaded Handout(s)

 

Recommended Items to have available:  graph paper, protractor

 

     Work is to be done in pencil (lab reports may be typed).  Exams are to be in pencil only.

 

Most handouts will be available only online through school loop.  Students will be expected to download the appropriate handout(s) prior to arriving in class.  Some handouts will be given the old fashion way, it will be handed out in class.  There will be a charge for replacement handouts in class.  You are not entitled to replacements.  

 

Be responsible: keep and organize all materialsreceived in class.  It will be the student’s responsibility for downloading these in a timely fashion. Computer failures will not be accepted as an excuse for not obtaining said materials.  You should expect this practice to become more common in the future in many aspects of life.  Be prepared to utilize other computer systems in the event your system goes down.

 

2.PARTICIPATION  (supports academic success, academic responsibility and social responsibility)

Class participation will comprise 5-15% of your grade. This includes, but is not limited to: bringing required materials to class, having done the previous night's homework, attendance and punctuality, taking class notes, quality and quantity of work in labs and other group activities and observing class policies.

Participation checks are made randomly to assess compliance with class policies.  Participation points are earned in this way.  Deficient participation will result in obtaining less than 100% of the available points, depending upon the degree of the deficiency. Superior participation can result in bonus points (see extra credit), and these can be achieved through assisting in demonstrations, class discussions, and so forth.  The benefit of participation is 

more than mere points as it supports the student’s own learning.

 

IMPORTANT:  YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE TOLD AN ADVANCE NOT TO DO SOMETHING FOR IT TO BE CONSIDERED INAPPROPRIATE – CONSIDER EVERY ACTION BEFORE YOU TAKE IT -

 

3.ATTENDANCE – MAKE UP WORK  (supports academic success and academic responsibility)

Homework missed due to an excused absence may be made up, but it is the student's responsibility to find out what was missed and to complete it before the day you return. If you miss a day you are responsible for the homework the day you return. TURN LATE WORK IN DIRECTLY TO THE TEACHER  Work missed due to unexcused absence will generally result in a zero. Tardy consists of not being inyour assigned seatwhen the bell rings. 

 

4.  PASSES     An excused tardy requires a signed pass by the responsible teacher, advisor, or administrator.  If you are       involved in an activity that will cause you to leave class, you must either have a pass already as stipulated above, or a valid list must have been submitted prior to the event (this includes clubs, sports, etc). Remember, your instructor can not dismiss you to an activity without an appropriate pass or documentation.

 

5.DUE DATES:           

A.  Home work and lab assignments along with due dates will be posted in SCHOOL LOOP. It is the student's responsibility to read these at the beginning of the week and to review them daily for possible changes. No computer printed or typed homeworkwill be accepted – long hand only(neatly).

C.  Late workwill be accepted late at a loss of 1/3 credit per day, up to a maximum of 3 days late (0 after)

D.  LABS:If you are absent with a valid excuse during a lab, you may complete an out of class/at home make up lab.  You are responsible for communicating with the instructor about this.  You are responsible for supplying the needed lab materials and the report is due within 5 days of returning from an absence.Lab reports not turned in on time for any reason, including the absence of any group member or due to computer issues are considered late.  Again, the instructor will not approach you about a missed lab, so do not forget!

F.  Unexcused absences/cuts result in a score of 0 for all missed work including exams.

            G   Examsmust be made up promptly after your absence at the date and times announced. Exams not made up within 5 school days of returning will receive only 1/2 credit.  Make up exams will be somewhat different from the original and must be completed prior to the next regular exam.  Any exam not made up by the next exam will receive a 0 score. If you return from an absence on an exam day, you will still be required to take the exam with the other students.  Returning to class on an exam day following an absence doesnotconstitute justification for a postponement of taking the exam.  An exam may not be taken on any day prior to its scheduled date.

 

6.  HOMEWORK (supports academic success and academic responsibility)

  1. Each unit has a contract which shows the required readings, homework assignments, supplemental problems and a list of labs.  You should print the contract at the start of each new unit.
  2. All homework questions should be clearly identified and the homework set properly titled.
  3. All questions should be answered completely, showing all work and written in complete sentences.
  4. At the end of each unit, turn in a homework packet which includes: the name, date, period, and a title of the assignmentat the top of the homework assignment.
  5. Homework will be graded and placed in the class cubby.  It is available for you to pick up.  Homework is generally not handed back in class

MISSION

To provide all students with a strong educational program that prepares them to thrive in a global society. 

 

VISION

To be a community-based learning center where an atmosphere of success, innovation and self-empowerment will exist for all students.

 

The PIRATE WAY:

 

Problem Solver: I will:

 

Independent Thinker: I will:

·       Use critical thinking skills to understand and address local and world issues.

·       Be able to evaluate a wide range of opinions and resources on their own.

Responsible Individual: I will:

 

Academic Achiever: I will:

 

Technologically Competent: I will:

·       Evaluate and integrate multiple sources of information into coursework.

Effective Communicator: I will:

 

 

  1. Homework may only be written, NOT typed.  It should be neat – no scratch outs, etc.
  2. Homework scores are based upon completion, quality of written skills, and accuracy. Homework problems which do not show work and show answers only will receive zero credit.
  3. Copying or allowing to copy another person’s homework is a form of cheating.

 

 

7.  LAB REPORTS (See Sample Report – separate handout) (supports academic success)

a) Lab reports may be done in pen, pencil, ortyped. (bonus point if typed, 100% max score)

b) Labs involve working in a group. In most cases a "group" report will be OK.  However, the author’s name shouldappear first and be underlined. Inactive group members or absent group members should not be credited for the lab and their name(s) not listed. 

c)   Allstudents will be actively involved in data collection.  Students deemed as non participating will have an accordingly adjusted lab score.  Students not actively involved in all aspects of the lab may receive reduced or no credit.

d)  Students will jointly discuss and check data at the lab bench before returning to desks

e)  Lab Report Contents and Formatting can be found in the Lab Report Guidelines and the details of each individual lab. A student should utilize both items in the completion of a report..

g)   Grouplab reports not submitted on time are late, regardless of the reason.  (see due dates)

h)  If a student misses a lab, it may be made up the directions above.  A maximum of 60 extra credit points are available each semester.  A student who fails to make up a lab should consider completing extra credit as a means of offsetting the missing lab.

 

8.  EXAMS  (supports academic success)    Exams will cover multiple chapters, are always announced in class, and will be reviewed in class on the day they are returned.  Exams are kept on file following the review.  Parents may make an appointment to review the exam with the instructor.

 

9.  SAFETY (supports academic success, academic responsibility and social responsibility)

·Make sure you are familiar with all equipment before using it.

·Be familiar with earthquake and fire procedures including evacuation routes.

·Chemicals are routinely used in science courses.   If the student has a history of allergic reactions to chemical substances, please notify the science teacher.

DO NOT TOUCH ANY EQUIPMENT, INCLUDING COMPUTERS, UNLESS TOLD TO DO SO BY YOUR TEACHER.

 

10.     EXTRA CREDIT  (supports academic success and academic responsibility)

A maximum 45 points of x-credit is allowed per semester (about 5% of grade).  It is posted to the grade only at the end of each grading period, and only if the student has a grade of at least C-.  Students with grades below C- are encouraged to still do extra credit, as it can be retroactively applied to a student’s grade if they achieve a minimum grade of C- at some point during the semester.  

Extra Credit Is Available As Follows:           10pts MAX  1stGrading Period

                                                                  15pts MAX  2ndGrading Period

                                                                  20pts MAX  3rdGrading Period

Extra credit from later grading periods may notbe applied to previous grading periods.  However, extra credit from semester 1 will be rolled over to semester 2.  Any student who has failed to complete missing work should consider completing extra credit as a means of offsetting the missing work. 

Note:  45 points is the maximum amount of extra credit that may be completed in one semester.  See Extra Credit Sheet for opportunities.

 

     11.     HELP & CONTACT INFORMATION

We are generallyavailable for help outside of class, before or after.  (not during lunch, we all need to take a break!) 

We are also advisors to one club or another each year, to which we are obligated to yield some of our out of class time.  It is best to check with us before looking for us.  For general Chemistry help and questions, either of us will do.

Sites most haunted by Chemistry teachers:         K-5, D-6, D-13

Email: smithc@esuhsd.org or  traskm@esuhsd.org or macasaetl@esuhsd.org        Also we can be contacted through School Loop.

 

12.  INTEGRITY (supports academic success, academic responsibility, and social responsibility)

            Cheating includes sharingexam information, copying or allowingothers to copyhomework or lab reports.  Consequences for cheating are a zero for assignment and  students will forfeit the privilege of recommendations as well as extra credit (including points already accumulated.

 

13.GRADING

Percent of grade                                                                                                         

EXAMS AND QUIZZES            45-55% of grade          

LAB REPORTS                                    20-30%            of grade

HOMEWORK                            10-20% of grade

PARTICIPATION                      5-15% of grade                   

 

Letter Grades

A- = 90.00%

B- = 80.00%

C- = 70.00%

D- = 55.00% 

Grades are updated regularly on Schoolloop – You should inspect it regularly.  If you have questions about a particular posting (score on assignment, etc) , inquire immediately.  A posting is permanent after 2 weeks!!!  You are responsible for inspecting your scores.

 

Classroom Expectations and Consequences

TREAT EVERYONE WITH RESPECT.  ONE PERSON TALKS AT A TIME.  BE A GOOD LISTENERBESUPPORTIVE.

Discipline Chart

Consequence 1:Verbal Warnng, Consequence 2:detention and parent contacted, Consequence 3:Referral         

                                                

 

 


PHYSICS COURSE OUTLINE

09/05/18

PHYSICS COURSE OUTLINE

2014-2015

Students are responsible for knowing and complying with all of the following:

 

The PIRATE WAY:

 

Problem Solver: I will:

 

Independent Thinker: I will:

Responsible Individual: I will:

 

Academic Achiever: I will:

 

Technologically Competent: I will:

Effective Communicator: I will:

 

MISSION

To provide all students with a strong educational program that prepares them to thrive in a global society. 

 

VISION

To be a community-based learning center where an atmosphere of success, innovation and self-empowerment will exist for all students.

 

A  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Physics is a mathematical based science course which explores the fundamental behaviors of the universe.  Topics include kinematics, gravity, Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum, thermodynamics, oscillations, electromagnetism, and a smattering of optics.  We will briefly consider social issues associated with nuclear science.

 

Activities include teacher presentations and demonstrations, student discussions and laboratory activities.  Students will often assist the teacher in demonstrations of concepts (participants receive participation points).  Labs are conducted both in and out of class and in groups. Naturally, the course will also have its share of assigned homework and exams.

 

B  PRE-REQUISITES

MATH ABILITIES:  Proficiency with basic algebra is expected.  This course will not teach nor explain algebraic operations.  It is the student’s responsibility prior to entering this course to have the minimum required mathematical skills.

LITERACY SKILLS:  The student is expected to have literacy skills and a basis of vocabulary consistent with the level of a high school student who is college bound, as well as vocabulary from pre-requisite course material.  

SCIENCE COURSES:  All students are expected to have previously taken some physical science (middle school).  Consequently, the student is expected to be familiar with the relevant material, including operational use of the metric system, basic algebra, and arithmetic.

 

C  OBJECTIVE LEARNING GOALS

1.STANDARDS  The major objective is for all students to become proficient in the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards).  (see Schoolloop Locker for a detailed list of these standards). Assessments of success will be in the form of homework, laboratory investigations (reports), quizzes (free response format), and examinations (multiple choice format) Students will identify a relevant standard for every assignment.

 

2.THE PIRATE WAY   Students will connect Piedmont Hill’s Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) to their physics activities. These are available and detailed in a separate document.

 

3.ACCADEMIC SKILLS – TOOLS FOR SUCCESS      Physics is a supportive stepping stone to college. Many of the skills needed to succeed in college can be further developed in a physics course and their development is an objective.                           i           Physics is a mathematically based field of science and students will enhance and utilize their problem solving and math skills through home work, in laboratory work, and on exams. These skills are critical to success.

            ii          As good written communication is essential in all things, literacy skills will be emphasized.  Many homework problems are descriptive, rather than mathematical.  Laboratory reports require competent writing skills. Scoring of reports and quizzes is partly based upon the quality of the written communication (grammar, spelling, etc.)

            iii         Students are expected to take notes anytime information is presented in class and these notes will be subject to review (see participation)  Information is often times available to students only via a teacher led presentation or discussion (some college courses actually are entirely lecture based – no books!)  It is vital that the student retain this information for later reference. Consequently, note taking and summative skills will be stressed.

 

4.ACCADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY TO SUCCESS      Success in a physics course (and college) depends heavily on a student’s fulfillment of their responsibilities to themselves.  This can be thought of in various ways – good work habits, discipline, a structured routine.  A student needs to maintain a commitment in order to achieve academic success.

            I           Completion of all work assigned is vital to success. There is no “busy” work in physics. Assignments and activities have been selected to reinforce concepts and further understanding of NGSS.  Failure to complete such assignments will both undermine the student’s learning, and instill the impression that the student does not take their education seriously.  Additionally, failure to complete all work can be a warning sign that the student has attempted too much responsibility – little is accomplished by overloading one’s self and achieving only marginal success. 

            II          Appropriate conduct (see participation below) is also important to success. Positive participation furthers the student’s learning while failing in this jeopardizes her or his own chances for success, as well as others.  Students are expected to be considerate of the desire and efforts of other students to succeed as well. A participation grade will be a component of the student’s overall grade, to reflect the student’s success fulfilling this responsibility. 

            III         Regular and punctual attendance is required for your personal success and that of others. Excessive absences will impact learning.  You are responsible for all work and material that is presented during an absence.  

            IV  DUE DATESshould be met for all work.  Homeworkand lab assignments with due dates will be posted in SCHOOL LOOPeach day. It is the student's responsibility to read these at the beginning of the week and to review them daily for possible changes.               

D  CLASS POLICIES and FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO GRADE

1.MATERIALS  (supports academic success and academic responsibility)

The following 8 items are essential for success at all times unless noted otherwise

textbook (may be kept at home)

2pencils or other erasable writing tools

ruled or graph paper (for notes and work)

4 organized binder with notes, handouts, current homework and returned work. Be responsible

scientific calculator

ruler and protractor

School ID

a means of saving computer generated work electronically (flash drive, email account, etc)

access to a dictionary (hard copy, electronic, etc)

 

2.PARTICIPATION (supports academic success, academic responsibility and social responsibility)

            Education is not a spectator sport, nor an individual one. Each person affects the educational opportunities of others, for better or worse. Class participation will comprise 5-15% of your grade, but it is more than mere points as it supports the student’s own learning. This includes, but is not limited to: bringing essential materials to class, having done the previous night's homework, attendance and punctuality, taking class notes, quality and quantity of work in labs and other group activities and observing class policies. 

            Nearly all class materials will be available online through school loop (very helpful if you are prone to losing documents). Computer failures will not be accepted as an excuse for late work. You are not required to type any submitted work. Hand written work is acceptable. 

NOTE:You should expect the integration of computers in your college career to be common practice, as well as in many aspects of life in the future.  If your computer system falters and you are determined to use a computer, be prepared to find alternatives. If you are attempting to print something out at home, the physics printer is available (when it’s in a good mood J) Again, this will not be an excuse for a late lab report, etc --- do it by hand.

            Students are expected to “tune in” to the classroom environment and disconnect from their social networks during class time. All prohibited electronic devices are to be off and put away during class time.

            Examples ofdeficientparticipationinclude, but are not limited to: doing work for other classes, inattention during presentations, sleeping in class, eating in class, talking across the room, defacing school property, eating, tardiness, sleeping, littering, handling equipment without permission, leaving your seat without permission and any other immature (disrespectful, inconsiderate) behavior. Inappropriate use of computers may result in prohibition of future use (This includes a zero grade on future computer-based labs). Pagers, cell phones, MP3, CD, tape players (etc) and earphones are not allowed in the classroom. They will be confiscated per school policiesComputersare to be used only with permission and for stipulated purposes. Unauthorized use is grounds for prohibition of future use.  

 

TARDIES  Tardy consists of not being inyour assigned seatwiththe when the bell rings. Five "excused” tardies will be allowed per semester. After 5, an excused tardy will be considered unexcused, regardless of the “Excuser”. Tardies will affect your participation grade. Do not abuse this.

 

Participation checks are made randomly to assess compliance with class policies.  Participation points are earned in this way.  Deficient participation will result in obtaining less than 100% of the available points, depending upon the degree of the deficiency. Superior participation can result in bonus points (see extra credit), and these can be achieved through assisting in demonstrations, class discussions, and so forth.  

 

IMPORTANT:  YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE TOLD IN ADVANCE NOT TO DO SOMETHING FOR IT TO BE CONSIDERED INAPPROPRIATE – CONSIDER EVERY ACTION BEFORE YOU TAKE IT –

 

TREAT EVERYONE WITH RESPECT.

TO BE HERE IS TO PARTICIPATE, TO NOT PARTICIPATE IS TO NOT BE HERE

ONE PERSON TALKS AT A TIME.  BE A GOOD LISTENER

BESUPPORTIVE

 

3. DUE DATES & LATE WORK 

– Computer crashes, etc. are not acceptable excuses for late work

A.  Home work and lab assignments along with due dates will be posted in SCHOOLLOOP each week. It is the student's responsibility to read these at the beginning of the week and to review them daily for possible changes. No computer printed or typed homeworkwill be accepted – long hand only(neatly). 

B.  Excused Absences: Work is due the day of the student’s return to class. If the homework is “doomed” it will be exempt on the day of absence but not the day of return.  This includes the homework assignment just before a test or quiz.  

C.  Late work will be accepted only at the discretion of the teacher, and with a penalty. No late work will be accepted more than a week after its due date. Work missed due to an unexcused absence/cut, will receive a zero, including exams.

D. LABS:If you are absent with a valid excuse during a lab, you may complete an out of class/at home make up lab. You are responsible for communicating with the instructor about this.  You are responsible for supplying the needed materials and the report is due within 5 days of returning from an absence.Lab reports not turned in on time for any reason, including the absence of any group member or due to computer issues are considered late.  Again, the instructor will not approach you about a missed lab, so do not forget!

            E.   Examsmust be made up promptly after your absence at the date and times announced.  Exams not made up within 5 school days of returning will receive only 1/2 credit.  Make up exams will be somewhat different from the original and must be completed prior to the next regular exam.  Any exam not made up by the next exam will receive a 0 score. If you return from an absence on an exam day, you will still be required to take the exam with the other students.  A student who returns from an absence on an exam day will take the exam as scheduled. An exam may not be taken on any day prior to its scheduled date.

 

NO WORK MAY BE SUMBITTED ELECTRONICALLY (e-mail, etc.) WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL

 

Once an item has been submitted, it may not be altered: missing components may not be added later, etc. 

 

 

4. HOMEWORK  (supports academic success and academic responsibility)

            A. See due dates above regarding homework.

            B.  For grading purposes, HOMEWORK refers to NON Laboratory Report work – they are a separate category.

C.  All questions should be answered completely, showing all work and written in complete sentences.

 D.  At the top of the homework assignment should be name, date, period

 Additionally, written out fully should be one NGSS standard that was addressed by the homework set. And

Written out fully should be one PIRATE WAY that was relevant to the homework set.

            E.  Homework must be hand written. It should be neat – no scratch outs, etc.

            F.  TYPED HOMEWORK WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. A REWRITE WILL BE CONSIDERED LATE

            G.Homework scores are based upon completion, quality of written skills, and accuracy.

5.  LAB REPORTS(See Sample Report – separate handout)  (supports academic success)

a) Lab reports may be done in pen, pencil, ortyped. (bonus point if typed, 100% max score)

b) In most cases a "group" report will be OK.  However, the author’s name should appear first and be underlined.  Inactive or absent group members should not be credited for the lab and their name(s) not listed.  

c)   Allstudents will be actively involved in data collection.  Students deemed as non participating will have an accordingly adjusted lab score.  Students not actively involved in all aspects of the lab may receive reduced or no credit.

d)  Students will jointly discuss and check data at the lab bench before returning to desks

e)  The Contents and Formatting of a lab report should include the details of the individual lab and follow the Lab Report Guidelines(see schoolloop physics locker). Both  items should be used to complete the report..

g)   Lab reportswill be given due dates as well.  Grouplab reports not submitted on time are late, regardless of the reason.  (see due dates)  

h)  If a student has an excused absence for a lab, a home make up lab can generally be arranged.  The student is responsible for supplying most of the materials in such instances.

 

6. EXAMS  (supports academic success)    Exams will cover anywhere from part of a chapter to multiple chapters, including materials from previous exam chapters. Exams are always announced in class, and will be reviewed in class on the day they are returned. Exams are kept on file following the review.  Parents may make an appointment to review the exam with the instructor.  Exam/Quiz averages trend at 65% which is consistent with the state physics test for achieving proficiency.  Students often do not perform as well on exams as they do on other work where they have outside resources available. Exams are not permitted to leave the classroom. Anyone who wishes to review an exam may make an appointment to meet with the teacher to do so.

 

7. PASSES TO CLASS     An excused tardy requires a signed pass by the responsible teacher, advisor, or administrator.  If you are involved in an activity that will cause you to leave class, you must either have a pass already as stipulated above, or a valid list must have been submitted prior to the event (this includes clubs, sports, etc). Remember, your instructor can not dismiss you to an activity without an appropriate pass or documentation.

 

8. HALL PASS  The hall pass is for emergency use of the bathroom only. It should be used infrequently. If you have need of it on a regular basis, then you should have a note from the health office stipulating this. You must ask your teacher to use the hall pass, AND you must leave your cellphone with the teacher until you return. Various incidents have taken place in restrooms and so forth during classes by students who were given a hall pass. 

 

9.  SAFETY  (supports academic success, academic responsibility and social responsibility)  Safety in the class is essential. Inappropriate behavior will not be tolerated and will result in a "0" on the lab. By enrolling in this course you are agreeing to use common sense safety and obey the following rules 

·Make sure you are familiar with all equipment before using it.

·Be familiar with earthquake and fire procedures including evacuation routes.

·Chemicals are routinely used in science courses (very modestly in physics).  If the student has a history of allergic reactions to chemical substances, please notify the science teacher.

DO NOT TOUCH ANY EQUIPMENT, INCLUDING COMPUTERS, UNLESS TOLD TO DO SO BY YOUR TEACHER.

 

10.EXTRA CREDIT 

See Extra Credit Guidelines for opportunities.

 

11.  INTEGRITY (supports academic success, academic responsibility, and social responsibility)

                  Cheating includes sharingexam information, copying or allowingothers to copyhomework or lab reports.  Consequences for cheating extend beyond a grade of zero on the work in question.  Students will be reported to the National Honor Society and also forfeit any recommendations as well as extra credit (including points already accumulated). 

 

12 GRADING

      (breakdown at END OF SEMESTERS)

      EXAMS/QUIZZES                                                                                                        30% of grade

      Lab Reports & Other Group Work                                                                                 25% of grade

      Homework/Participation                                                                                                            20% of grade

      Special Assignments (New- catch all common core category                                         25% of grade

 

      GRADES

      90%     A-

      80%     B-

      70%     C-

      55%     D-

 

 

Average Exam Grade = 60%.             A student who meets this average and completes ALLother work and ALL XCRcan earn a B-.

 

EX:      60% on exams ~ 30% towards overall grade.

            100% on all other work ~ 50% towards overall grade.

            The total is 80% which is a B-.

            Higher grades require higher test performance.

Historic Exam Averages and Overall Grade

            60% Exam Average     typically students earned a C-

            70% Exam Average     typically students earned a B-

            80% Exam Average     typically students earned an A-

            (NOTE: these are historic averages and not guarantees) – Students rarely get 100% on all other work

            Adjust your thinking as to what constitutes a “good” exam grade

 

Average percentage of students earning Proficient or better on the State Physics CST (STAR) = 85%

2010-2011 Class: 90% achieved proficiency or better on Physics STAR

 

Grades are updated regularly on Schoolloop – You should inspect it regularly.  If you have questions about a particular posting (score on assignment, etc) , inquire immediately.  A posting is permanent after 2 weeks!!!  You are responsible for inspecting your scores.

 

               14.   HELP & CONTACT INFORMATION

Schoolloop is the primary means of contacting us. We are generallyavailable for help outside of class, before or after.  (not during lunch, we all need to take a break!) We are also advisors to one club or another each year, to which we are obligated to yield some of our out of class time.  It is best to check with us before looking for us.  For general physics help and questions, either of us will do.

                  Sites most haunted by physics teachers:      D-17 Physics Classroom, D-18 Science Office, D27 Mr. Dries Room

                  Email:  SCHOOL LOOP or aberlel@esuhsd.org or  traskm@esuhsd.org